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Sonnet 06 Then let not winter's ragged hand deface

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare Sonnets
Sonnets are fourteen-line lyric poems, traditionally written in iambic pentameter - that is, in lines ten syllables long, with accents falling on every second syllable, as in: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?".

Sonnet 06 Then let not winter's ragged hand deface

Then let not winter's ragged hand deface
In thee thy summer, ere thou be distill'd:
Make sweet some vial; treasure thou some place
With beauty's treasure, ere it be self-kill'd.
That use is not forbidden usury,
Which happies those that pay the willing loan;
That's for thyself to breed another thee,
Or ten times happier, be it ten for one;
Ten times thyself were happier than thou art,
If ten of thine ten times refigured thee:
Then what could death do, if thou shouldst depart,
Leaving thee living in posterity?
Be not self-will'd, for thou art much too fair
To be death's conquest and make worms thine heir.

Shakespearean Sonnet 06 Then let not winter's ragged hand deface

William Shakespeare Sonnet 06 Then let not winter's ragged hand deface. Famous William Shakespeare love poem known as Shakespearean Sonnet 06 Then let not winter's ragged hand deface. Famous Shakespearean sonnet, or short poem, entitled William Shakespeare Sonnet 06 Then let not winter's ragged hand deface.

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